This Is Why You Should Never Let Your Dog Lick Your Mouth

Dogs are undoubtedly our best friends, and the relationship with our furry beloved ones is strong and full of love and affection.  Our dogs show their love with their dog lick, but unfortunately, we need to tell you that their tongue is a surface full of bacteria.

The mouth of a dog can never be cleaner than a human mouth, let’s be clear. The author and dog expert Marty Becker explains it as follows:

“All you have to do is look, watch, smell and you’ll realize that is not true. They raid the garbage can. You know, we give each other a peck on the cheek when we say hello, they give each other a peck on the rear end.”

Moreover, according to John Oxford, professor of virology and bacteriology at the Queen Mary University in London,

“It is not just what is carried in saliva. Dogs spend half their life with their noses in nasty corners or hovering over dog droppings so their muzzles are full of bacteria, viruses, and germs of all sorts.”

Those sweet dog kisses should definitely be avoided, as they are a way to pass diseases, such as Capnocytophaga Canimorsus, Ringworm infections, MRSA infections, and Staphylococcus aureus.

Therefore, no matter how much you enjoy it, do not let your dog lick you in order to prevent such diseases.  There are so many other ways to enjoy your mutual affection.

Jean Marie Bauhaus, a pet blogger, and novelist from Tulsa, Oklahoma, advises:

“While it might be safe to allow your pooch to lick you on the face and mouth if you’d prefer not to take the chance, the best thing to do is nip the behavior in the bud by teaching your dog not to lick your face.

Pet trainer Victoria Stillwell, speaking to Animal Planet, suggests that the best way to do so is to get up and walk away from your dog when he starts to lick, ignoring the behavior completely. Doing so will deprive your dog of any reward he receives from licking, and eventually, he’ll stop trying altogether. “

She adds:

“You can lower the risk of contracting illnesses from dog kisses by simply being a responsible pet parent. Regular health checks that include fecal examinations, deworming and treatments to control fleas, ticks and other parasites can go a long way toward reducing the chances that your dog can pass an infection on to you.

Properly disposing of your dog’s deposits and thoroughly washing your hands afterward can also reduce the risk of spreading disease. Additionally, it’s important that your pup’s food should be cooked thoroughly — never give him anything raw that might be a source of bacterial infection, such as raw meat or a pig’s ear to chew on.

Choose a dog food that is balanced and formulated for your dog’s health first and foremost. You should also brush your dog’s teeth regularly to maintain his oral health, and kill bacteria that might be looming in his mouth.”

Source: healthandhealthyliving.info